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Not only did this gent have an interesting method of shoplifting shoes, but he took orders by text! As reported by www.fox41.com:

An arrest report for 36-year-old Sean A. Harrington lists him as “not employed,” but some may say that’s debatable after reading the description of his alleged crimes. Police say he was caught stealing merchandise from Rack Room Shoes on S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., near Six Mile Lane, on Friday afternoon. According to the report, Harrington was allegedly, “concealing shoes down the front of his pants” and left the store without paying.

That can’t be too comfortable …

From there, he allegedly proceeded to a Marshalls clothing store, and allegedly stole clothing valued at $99.95.

Police eventually caught up with Harrington and arrested him.

Let’s go to the videotape …

When a security at Rack Room Shoes reviewed their surveillance records, they discovered that Harrington had stolen a total of $539.89 worth of goods from their store between April 17 and May 20.

And how did the police figure out he was taking orders? Easily.

Upon Harrington’s arrest, police were able to examine his cell phone — and they made a significant discovery. The arrest report states that the phone, “had numerous text messages of others ordering merchandise from [Harrington], who would then go out and steal specific items.”

Doh!

He was charged with receipt of stolen property and theft by unlawful taking.

Here’s the source.

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It’s not always good to keep it in the family. See, it all depends on what “it” is. This, the family could have done without. As reported by ksat.com (San Antonio, Texas):

A man is accused of robbing from a popular West Side restaurant that is owned by his brother-in-law. Felipe Barron Jr., 53, is charged with robbery.

Yup.

According to an arrest affidavit, Barron was caught stealing cash from the safe at Ray’s Drive Inn located in the 800 block of SW 19th street back in April.

The affidavit stated the owner saw Barron closing a safe and confronted him inside the restaurant because Barron was not authorized to be there or employed there.

The affidavit stated Barron tried to run away but was chased by the owner. Barron then struck the owner in the chest before fleeing on foot.

So much for Thanksgiving Dinner.

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No, this gent didn’t perform this feat with his hands tied behind his back. They were cuffed! As reported by The Highline Times:

King County [Washington] Sheriff’s deputies were called to help Burien officers in a search for a handcuffed man who escaped custody at the Burien courthouse.

Hell, his hands were cuffed behind his back. How far could he get?

He was believed to be driving a white Oldsmobile Alero with a license plate registered to a home in Renton.

Driving?

Deputies went to the address and found the man wasn’t there.

A deputy parked around the corner from the home to watch for the Alero. When the deputy saw the Alero pull into the driveway of the home he activated his emergency lights.

The driver did not comply with the deputies’ order to exit the vehicle but confirmed he was still handcuffed. Deputies said the man had driven about 12 miles between the courthouse and the Renton house without use of his hands in front of him.

Shazam! 12 miles of driving like that? Shazam! Here’s the source.

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If more people were as suspicious as this “good samaritan,” The Juice would move to an island. Hell, he might just do it any way. As reported by khou.com:

A loving husband triggered a massive police presence on Tuesday at a Cricket Store in southeast Houston.

Police received a call that someone in the store was being held against their will.

What did the man do to warrant all this?

Actually, the store manager was hugging her husband goodbye.

A passerby saw the embrace and thought she was being held hostage.

Next time, do us all a favor, and keep it to yourself!

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If you’re having success running the ball, you keep running the ball until the opposing team counters it by, say, putting more men in the box. (Yes, The Juice likes football.) But in life, going back to something that worked is not always a good idea, especially in the world of crime. Just ask this gent. As reported by The New Hampshire Union Leader:

A Plymouth man was arrested for allegedly committing two armed robberies at the same location about six weeks apart, police said Saturday.

Yup. He did.

Jason Crosby, 32, was arrested in Plymouth late Friday on two counts of armed robbery. Bail was set at $100,000, and he is slated for arraignment Monday in 9th Circuit Court in Nashua.

Crosby is accused of robbing Haffner’s Kick Stop at 215 Lowell Road on July 7 at 10:37 p.m. and again on Friday at 3:06 a.m., police said.

In the first robbery, Crosby displayed a small black semi-automatic handgun and demanded money from the clerk, authorities said. The second time, the suspect claimed to have had a weapon and again demanded money, police said.

You’ll find the source (and a mug shot) here.

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It’s not uncommon for police officers to charge people who flip them off. When those people fight the charges, they win. But what about f-bombing a police officer? Well, that depends, as an Ohio woman recently found out. As reported in The Knoxville News Sentinel:

Dorthea Frazier’s son Cody was arrested by Akron police after a brief car chase. Dorthea Frazier yelled at the arresting officers: “What the f[uck] are you arresting my son for? What are you doing?” She then yelled at a lieutenant: “You f[uck]ing crooked a– cop” and “You’re a b[astard?].” [uncensored by The Juice].

The lieutenant apparently ordered her to desist from further yelling, but Frazier persisted. Officers on the scene testified that her cursing drew a growing crowd and presented a possibly dangerous situation.

Officers charged her with resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. In the course of her arrest, she suffered a broken arm.

Her defense, of course, was the First Amendment. The result?

A jury found her guilty of disorderly conduct. During that trial, she requested a jury instruction on freedom of speech that read in part:

“In the event that you find that the Defendant’s conduct was Constitutionally protected free speech, then you must find the defendant not guilty. A person cannot be convicted of disorderly conduct based on the words the person has spoken because such speech is constitutionally protected unless the defendant’s words rise to the level of fighting words.

“A person cannot be convicted of disorderly conduct by the use of words because the First Amendment protects a significant amount of verbal criticism and challenge directed at police officers.”

The Judge refused the request. Ms Frazier appealed and … lost. You can read a lot more here.

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Yes sir. These streakers were in for a real surprise when they ran into a police officer while streaking through a neighborhood in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. And they got what was coming to them, which was … nothing! As it should have been with this truly victimless crime. Per The Union Leader:

In a scene reminiscent of Will Ferrell’s run through the neighborhood au naturel in the movie “Old School,” a Greenland police officer working a construction detail on Bartlett Street early Monday morning got a surprise when a naked woman ran by him.

Portsmouth police responded around 3:30 a.m., and found a man also out and about without any clothes on. The pair said they were playing strip poker with friends and, as part of losing, had to run around the block in the buff.

When police brought the two back to retrieve their clothes, they found two other people in various stages of undress. The streakers got off with a warning.

Sanity!

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I guess it depends on what you mean by “helping.” If you mean helping the possible jumper – who had been standing on the bridge for hours – make up his mind, then yes, Lai Jiansheng provided a helping hand to Chen Fuchao. Lai approached Chen and shook his hand, then pushed him off the bridge! Luckily for Chen, as reported by The China Post,

[he] fell 26 feet (8 meters) onto a partially inflated emergency air cushion laid out by authorities and survived, suffering spine and elbow injuries, the official Xinhua News Agency said Saturday.

Really? Only 26 feet? Why was Chen on the bridge?

According to Xinhua, Chen wanted to kill himself because he had accrued 2 million yuan (US$290,000) in debt from a failed construction project.

Okay, but the burning question is, why did Lai push him?

… Lai Jiansheng had been fed up with what he called Chen’s “selfish activity,” Xinhua said. Traffic around the Haizhu bridge in the city of Guangzhou had been backed up for five hours and police had cordoned off the area.

“I pushed him off because jumpers like Chen are very selfish. Their action violates a lot of public interest,” Lai was quoted as saying by Xinhua. “They do not really dare to kill themselves. Instead, they just want to raise the relevant government authorities’ attention to their appeals.”

Photos in the Beijing Morning Post showed Lai, shoeless and in a T-shirt, saluting after Chen fell.

Cold. But, here’s one more thing about Lai: it has been reported that “he had been on medication for “a mental illness” for decades and had been on his way to a hospital for his pills.” So what happened to Lai?

A police officer who answered the telephone Saturday at a station close to the bridge confirmed the incident and said it was under investigation. He refused to give any other details and hung up.

You can read more here.

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Connecticut Judge E. Curtissa Cofield said she had one beer and one mixed drink three hours before her blood alcohol level came in at .17, more than twice the legal limit. What do you think she would say if someone made the same claim in her courtroom?

As reported in The Courant, here’s how Judge Cofield was caught:

On Oct. 9 about 10:45 p.m., Cofield sideswiped a parked state police car, occupied by a trooper, with her BMW in a construction zone …

Instead of being contrite, here are a few things she had to say, as recorded by the police video:

Cofield asked [state police Sgt. Dwight] Washington: “Do you have a reading on my urine test, Negro trooper?”

She refused to sign a form and said: “I’m not signing anything, because when it comes down to the bottom line, who’s smarter, me or you? We’ll figure it out, won’t we?”

“I’m sick of being treated like a freaking Negro from the ‘hood,” she said. Asked if she had an illness and needed medication, Cofield said, “Negro-itis” and “I need to take anti-Negro, ummm …”

And this one, which was not in the video, but in the police report:

“Judge Cofield stated that she was the most intelligent person in the room and threatened our careers. … While speaking on her cellphone, Judge Cofield referred to Sgt. Washington as the ‘Head n—– in charge.'”

So what’s next for Judge Cofield, Connecticut’s first black female judge? The DUI and another charge will be dismissed if she successfully completes an alcohol education program. She’s also awaiting word from the Judicial Review Council, which held a hearing on January 26 on misconduct charges against her. Here’s the source.

Update: She was suspended for 8 months. And she’s in more trouble now, as you’ll see here.

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Regular Juice readers know about the various ways people smuggle things into jail, many of which are NSFW. This is a new one on The Juice. As reported by the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (Florida):

Deputies have arrested a Trinity woman after she concealed suboxone strips behind stamps on envelopes and mailed them to two inmates at the Pinellas County. The inmates in turn distributed and sold the controlled substance to other Pinellas County Jail inmates. Since the investigation began on August 1, 2013, deputies intercepted a total of 11 pieces of mail containing the opiate.

Pretty clever. Suboxone is also known as “heroin in a breath strip.” These folks had quite a business going, what with each stamp selling for $20.