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drinks drunk

How drunk was he? Pretty darned drunk. Per The New Hampshire Union Leader:

Authorities received a call from a Kingston Court homeowner who reported that a man she did not know had walked into her bedroom.

Uh-oh.

Police responded to the home and found [Ryan] Maszczak [35] asleep in a bed, according to a release.

“Maszczak was intoxicated and appeared to have walked into the wrong residence,” police said in the release.

Oops. The charges?

He was arrested [for criminal trespass] and later released on $1,000 personal recognizance bail. He will be arraigned Aug. 9 at the 9th Circuit Court, Merrimack District Division.

Can’t think of a defense for this one, although to be fair to Mr. Maszczak, The Juice is a personal injury lawyer, not a criminal lawyer.

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It’s often better for everyone if you can keep the family together. However, it’s also often better for everyone if the family, as a unit, ends. This case, and The Juice means “case” in two senses of the word, appears to fall in the latter category.  As reported by The Argus Leader:

An Iowa jury has found a father and daughter guilty of one count of false imprisonment in a case involving a lock up of the woman’s husband in a Lyon County grain bin.

Well, there was some good news.

Oriana Groppetti and her father, Craig Olson, now face up to one year in jail on the misdemeanor charge. The jury found the pair not guilty on two felony kidnapping charges, and on charges of assault while committing a felony.

You might be wondering what motivated Mr. Olson and his daughter.

[Derek Groppetti] had flown into Sioux Falls to see his wife on July 21. Oriana Groppetti been visiting her family in Canton, where Craig Olson lives, when her husband arrived and told her he wanted a marital separation.

That night, McAllister said, the whole family stayed up drinking, and the wife found messages about her husband’s affair on his phone. She broke his phone, then smashed her own across her husband’s face.

Derek Groppetti went to sleep that night, McAllister said, and hoped to fly home to California the following day.

“What Derek Groppetti didn’t know was that (his family) had spent the night coming up with a plan,” McAllister said.

That plan would have kept him in a grain bin for two to three days, the prosecutor said. He noted messages from Oriana Groppetti to her father that urged him to make sure her husband had water. Water and cereal were found in Olson’s truck, McAllister said.

“Would have” because …

Derek Groppetti pushed his way out of the first grain bin and was picked up by his wife, who took him to another farm with another grain bin. They met Olson there, and Olson said “we can do this the easy way or the hard way” just before his son-in-law ran to a neighboring farm house and dialed 911 with a borrowed cell phone.

Said the prosecutor:

“This was not a family dispute,” McAllister said. “These were crimes committed by these defendants against a family member.”

Said the victim:

Derek Groppetti, the alleged [“alleged”? – they were convicted] victim, testified last week that he didn’t feel he was kidnapped and that he wasn’t intimidated by his wife or father-in-law.

Really? Even in light of this evidence?

McAllister told the jury that the evidence was clear: Olson and Oriana Groppetti conspired to hold Groppetti against his will. Rhinehart and Willett both noted that the first bin wasn’t locked and that Derek Groppetti got out quickly, but McAllister suggested that the father and daughter didn’t expect him to escape.

He held up a text message from Olson to Oriana Groppetti, sent shortly after Olson drove away from the first bin site to make his point.

“Houdini couldn’t get out of there,” Olson wrote.

When Oriana saw her husband on the road, she sent her father a message from her iPad that read “he’s out,” then another that asked him to come quickly.

Houdini huh? You can read the full story here.

 

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So maybe that’s a little bit of hyperbole. Still, who would steal the baby Jesus? And why, in reporting about the theft, would anyone capitalize the word “Baby”? In any event, as reported by NJ Advance Media for nj.com:

A Rockaway Township husband and wife say they are “heartbroken” after a Baby Jesus was stolen from a nativity scene on their front lawn.

But Elaine and Mark Romito haven’t given up on retrieving the item that has graced the front of their home at 8 Daniel St. during the Christmas season for the past 22 years.

The couple is asking for help from the public in the hope that Baby Jesus will be returned.

What, are Joseph and Mary chopped liver?

You can read a lot more about this, and see a photo of the nativity scene, here.

 

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mother daughter bonding

Shared experiences among a mother and her daughter can be great. Or not. This definitely falls in the latter category. Per The New Hampshire Union Leader:

According to Manchester police Sgt. Brian O’Keefe, at 7:30 a.m. Friday multiple patrol units responded to 81 Ashland St. to investigate a report of a large fight and spoke with two victims, a 38-year-old mother and her daughter, 18.

The mother, whose name was not released, told police she was operating her motor vehicle in the area of Lowell and Ashland streets when two females refused to exit the road while riding bicycles. According to police, a brief argument ensued and the mother exited her vehicle and confronted the two bike riders.

Rule #1, don’t confront someone unless you’re prepared for the confrontation.

Police say this sparked what O’Keefe termed a “physical altercation” between the mother, her daughter and the two women, identified as Samantha Foss, 24, and Lindsey Paglieroni, 32, both of Manchester.

During the altercation, Foss allegedly stabbed the mother, causing a laceration to left arm. Foss then allegedly stabbed the woman’s daughter in the back of her neck. Both women were transported to the Elliot Hospital, where they were treated for non-life threatening injuries and released.

Should have just kept on driving.

Foss was arrested on charges of first degree assault, falsifying physical evidence and being a convicted felon for possessing a weapon after being previously convicted of a felony level offense. She is scheduled to be arraigned in the 9th Circuit Court in Manchester on Monday.

Here’s the source.

 

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no spitting spit

A Minnesota man was thinking no such thought as he got ready to … spit! And he paid the price. As reported by www.kare11.com (Minneapolis):

“I was walking to get some pizza with some buddies,” Thomas said.

The 21-year-old said he was getting over an illness and he spit as he was walking. He quickly learned that’s illegal in Minneapolis.

He must have been really surprised when the police officer warned … wait, he didn’t get a warning?

Police officers driving by in Dinkytown cited him for spitting, which carries a hefty fine. According to the city ordinance if you spit on sidewalks, bus or public areas it’s a $115 misdemeanor.

That could fill the coffers pretty fast, assuming the miscreants pay.

Thomas calls the law “wacky” but he’s sucking it up will pay the fine.

Here’s the source, including a photo of Mr. Thomas.

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phone text cell mobile texting

Normally it would be nice for a father to text his daughter. Here, not so much. As reported by wowt.com:

The Nebraska Supreme Court on Friday reversed a lower court’s issuance of a domestic abuse protection order for a 16-year-old girl against her father, saying his vulgar, obscenity-laced texts did not constitute abuse.

The decision came in the case of man listed in the opinion as “William N.” Court records indicate that the girl’s mother sought a domestic abuse protection order for her daughter earlier this year after the father sent the girl texts calling the girl, her boyfriend and her mother vulgar names.

A Valley County judge issued the protection order and William N. appealed. The state’s high court said that since he had not threatened to harm the teen, the lower court was wrong to issue a domestic abuse protection order.

That’s just beyond uncool. The man is lucky his daughter is a minor or the world would know his name. Here’s the source.

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A big “shout out” from The Juice to Mr. John Long of Loxahatchee, Florida for the assist (along with, or course, the Sun Sentinel) in further entrenching “legal juice” into our lexicon. How did he do this? Here’s how, as reported by the Sun Sentinel:

[Mr.] Long … is the alleged orange juice burglar, suspected of breaking into three Wellington homes Sunday night while residents were inside and stealing orange juice, reports WPTV News in West Palm Beach.

The Sun Sentinel went on to say (drum roll please) …

Now he’ll need a little legal juice.

Yes! Yes! Yes! I, er, I mean The Juice has arrived! … The Juice would like to thank the Academy, and everyone who has worked to make Legal Juice what it is today (whatever that is) …

But back to the story. Why steal OJ? Well …

“He did some ecstasy and PCP and hasn’t been right since. He’s having delusions of grandeur and other issues,” his father Vincent Long told WPTV News.

In all seriousness, please note that The Juice is basking in this worldwide recognition, not denigrating Mr. Long.

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You, a former judge, enter into a plea deal.  Your lawyer says it is a good plea deal. Then you reject it because it might impact your pension? Check this out, as reported by The Phladelphia Enquirer:

Former Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. on Thursday rejected a proposed guilty plea on conflict of interest charges after learning that it could imperil his state pension.

“It’s a shame, it was a good deal, but we just can’t risk the pension,” said Samuel C. Stretton, a lawyer for the 72-year-old former judge.

Stretton publicly announced Berry’s decision at a status hearing before Common Pleas Court Judge Michael Erdos.

With the plea off the table, Erdos transferred the case to trial Judge Donna Woelpper and set a pretrial hearing for Jan. 7.

Stretton said Berry, who retired two years ago, was to have pleaded guilty to charges he used his judicial office and court staff to operate his private real-estate business.

In return, Stretton said, Berry would have been sentenced to probation and would have agreed to pay restitution of $50,000.

A good deal? If you read the rest of the article, you’ll see that it was a great deal. Which leads one to wonder, does the former judge think he’s going to do better at trial? The reason it was such a good deal is because of the mountain of evidence against him! And he was going to get probation!

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You know how when you watch TV shows about jail or prison, the joints are filled with contraband? Well, it’s true. Some prisons have such a problem with prisoners using cell phones that they have to jam them! As for drugs in the joint, here’s an example, as reported by North Country Now (Potsdam, NY).

St. Lawrence County Sheriff deputies say they charged a St. Lawrence County Correctional Facility inmate with felonies for allegedly selling drugs while locked up.

Matthew J. Hough is charged with fourth-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance and first-degree promoting prison contraband, both felonies.

Deputies said he was allegedly found in possession of a narcotic drug and allegedly provided it to other inmates.

Hough was arraigned in Canton Town Court and sent back to the jail, deputies said.

Here’s the source.