Articles Posted in Weird Laws

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Let’s say you are in Akron, Ohio, you’re gay, and you see someone you’re interested in, who you think is interested in you. Well, you better be sure. Why? Check out this Akron ordinance:

133.04 – Importuning

… B. No person shall solicit a person of the same sex to engage in sexual activity with the offender, when the offender knows the solicitation is offensive to the other person, or is reckless in that regard.

Importuning? Really? Yup. Here it is.

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EXTENDED BODY:

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Is it just The Juice, or do you also find it ironic that this provision is in the Texas Constitution’s Bill of Rights? Here she goes:

Sec. 4.  RELIGIOUS TESTS. No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office, or public trust, in this State; nor shall any one be excluded from holding office on account of his religious sentiments, provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being.

Oh, so you’re religion doesn’t matter … as long as you have one. Whew. For a minute there, it seemed like this dang provision just didn’t belong in the “Bill of Rights.” Here’s a link to the text.

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Actually, madam, your money isn’t good anywhere in the United Kingdom. As a personal injury lawyer, but for his alter ego, this is not something The Juice would normally come across. No doubt Ms. Louise Munro would not have come across a law like the Coinage Act of 1971 either, had she not tried to pay for her gas with, well, coins! As reported by The Liverpool Echo:

Staff at the BP garage in Queens Drive, West Derby, told 24-year-old Louise Munro that they could not accept the 1p and 2p pieces she offered after her bank card failed because of a system failure.

Say what?

Ms Munro, from Roby, who went home to raid her piggy bank for the loose change to settle her debt, was even told by police over the phone that the garage was correct in refusing the payment after a row broke out.

According to the Royal Mint, 1p and 2p coins are legal only if something is bought for just 20p or less.

Under the little-known Coinage Act 1971 it is illegal to use 21 or more 1p pieces in a single transaction.

A truly brilliant customer relations move by the gas station…

Ms Munro, who denied she was being vindictive by handing over coppers, said: “I admit it’s annoying to have to count pennies but that’s all I had and I’m not the kind of person to leave a debt hanging. I wanted to settle it as soon as I could.

“As far as I was concerned it is legal tender – it has the Queen’s head on it and why would they produce them unless they could be used?”

Seems reasonable. After all, it’s only £30, and it’s not like it’s a daily occurrence.

The dispute happened on Sunday afternoon after Ms Munro’s RBS debit card was rejected because of the bank’s system troubles.

And it was brought about through no fault of Ms. Munro!

… she returned three hours later with two money bags filled with carefully counted-out coppers.

But after the garage searched the internet to see if they could accept the change they stumbled across a newspaper article from earlier this year telling of an accountant who was sued for trying to pay an £800 bill in coppers. There they learned of the Coinage Act 1971.

A phone call to the police also confirmed that Ms Munro’s payment contravened the Coinage Act.

[Garage worker Mugeen] Mohammed said the petrol station has not cashed the loose change and wants Ms Munro to return with an alternative form of payment.

Really? People are probably just lining up to buy gas at such a customer-friendly station.

Merseyside Police confirmed they were contacted over the dispute but said it was a “civil matter”.

Whew. No jail time. You’ll find the source here.

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How could The Juice possibly know that people in Wyoming were fishing with guns? Well, do you think they would have passed a law prohibiting it if nobody was doing it? Exactly! Here’s the law:

23-3-201. Fishing tackle; designation of waters for setline fishing; taking fish with firearm prohibited; snagging; penalties.

… (d) No person shall take, wound or destroy any fish of Wyoming with a firearm of any kind or nature.

Very sporting, right? And so much fun! Here’s the source.

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Can it really be a crime to father or have a second child? If it’s your second illegitimate child, and you’re subject to Mississippi law, then yes. As set forth in the Mississippi Code:

SEC. 97-29-11. Illegitimate children; person becoming natural parent of second illegitimate child; jurisdiction.

(1) If any person, who shall have previously become the natural parent of an illegitimate child within or without this state by coition within or without this state, shall again become the natural parent of an illegitimate child born within this state, he or she shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for not less than thirty (30) days nor more than ninety (90) days or by a fine of not more than Two Hundred Fifty Dollars ($250.00), or both. A subsequent conviction hereunder shall be punishable by imprisonment in the county jail for not less than three (3) months nor more than six (6) months or by a fine of not more than Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), or both. Provided, however, that for the purpose of this section, multiple births shall be construed to be the birth of one (1) child.

(2) The circuit court of the county in which said illegitimate child is born shall have jurisdiction of any action brought under this section. No male person shall be convicted solely on the uncorroborated testimony of the female person giving birth to the child.

Here’s the source.

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Sadly, Michiganders, you are now on notice of this law, though you were previously bound by it nonetheless. Here’s the law:

436.201 Drunkenness on train prohibited.

No person shall while in an offensive state of intoxication enter or be on or remain upon any railway train or interurban car as a passenger.

Putting aside that The Juice is a personal injury lawyer, nevertheless, he’s convinced he could mount a strong defense for anyone charged under this law based on a single word – “offensive.” Drunk? Hell yeah. But not offensively so. Case dismissed. Here’s a link to the law.

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Has The Juice lost it, you may be asking yourself? No, he’s just referring to a very strange law that is on the books in the City of Everett, Washington. Here it is:

9.24.010 Hypnotism unlawful.

It is unlawful for any hypnotist or mesmerist, or other person, to exhibit or display, or permit to be exhibited or displayed, any subject of any hypnotist or mesmerist, or any person while under the influence of or alleged influence of hypnotism or mesmerism, in any window or public place outside of the hall or theater where such hypnotist or mesmerist is giving his entertainment or exhibition.

You are feeling very sleepy … If you’re really interested, you’ll find the code section here. Just look for Chapter 9.24 (under Title 9).

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Well, at least in Nebraska, that’s what the law says. Here it is:

42-102. Minimum age; affliction with venereal disease, disqualification.

At the time of the marriage the male must be of the age of seventeen years or upward, and the female of the age of seventeen years or upward. No person who is afflicted with a venereal disease shall marry in this state.

Okay, but is it enforced? Not according to the annotations (cases citing the statute).

Marriage of one afflicted with venereal disease is not void but voidable [the unknowing party can walk] Christensen v. Christensen, 144 Neb. 763, 14 N.W.2d 613 (1944).

But …

Where party afflicted with venereal disease enters into marriage with full knowledge thereof, such party is barred from seeking annulment. Christensen v. Christensen, 144 Neb. 763, 14 N.W.2d 613 (1944).

And …

If parties are of the age of consent, the marriage is valid, even though license was wrongfully obtained. Baker v. Baker, 112 Neb. 738, 200 N.W. 1003 (1924).

Here’s the source.

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Remember the movie “Footloose,” about the town that outlawed dancing? Although South Carolina doesn’t ban dancing all the time, there is this restriction:

Title 52 – Amusements and Athletic Contests
CHAPTER 13.
DANCE HALLS

SECTION 52-13-10. Operation on Sunday forbidden.

It shall be unlawful for any person to keep open or admit persons to any public dancing hall owned or operated by him or to allow any person to continue thereat between the hours of twelve o’clock, midnight, Saturday and twelve o’clock, midnight, Sunday, and all such places shall be and remain closed to the public between such hours. The violation of the provisions of this section shall subject the offender to a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for the first offense and for the second offense not less than fifty dollars nor more than one hundred dollars or imprisonment for thirty days.

Yup, it’s on the books. You’ll find the law here.

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Isn’t everyone worried about being microchipped? If not by the government, then by someone else? No? Here’s a law that’s on the books in Wisconsin:

146.25  Required implanting of microchip prohibited.

(1) No person may require an individual to undergo the implanting of a microchip.

(2) Any person who violates sub. (1) may be required to forfeit not more than $10,000. Each day of continued violation constitutes a separate offense.

You’ll find the source here.