Articles Posted in Say What?

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This one is in its own category. As reported by

Paul Neaverson, 61, walked in to a branch of NatWest in Rainham, Kent and held a knife to the cashier’s neck.

However he was caught out when he asked the clerk to transfer the money in to his own bank account.

And why did he do it? Because he needed money to book a flight to Corfu for a job interview as a golf coach. Of course.

Maidstone Crown Court heard that during the terrifying raid the cashier managed to hit the panic button.

Neaverson fled, but undeterred, he only went as far as the HSBC just 400ft away where tried to hold up that bank too.

Danny Moore, defending, told the court that his client has been in trouble before and described his attempt to rob the banks as ‘ridiculous’.

He said: ‘It was ridiculous. It only had one ending – and here it is. He has led a law-abiding life and now finds himself staring down the barrel of a very long sentence indeed.’

Neaverson, of Rainham, Kent, pleaded guilty to two attempted robberies and possession of a blade. He has now been jailed for two years.

You’ll find the source here. 


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police officer

So if you get pulled over for a traffic matter, would it ever occur to you that you have a constitutional right not to identify yourself?  Yeah, me either. But this lady? Whoa. You’re not going to believe this. As reported by The Carroll County Times:

Close to a dozen members of a local advocacy group against what they consider to be the misapplication of federal and state law waited outside the Carroll County Detention Center to greet a woman released Tuesday morning who had been arrested after failing to identify herself after a routine traffic stop in June.

During her time at the detention center, the woman continued to refuse to identify herself, claiming it was her Fifth Amendment right.

Bob Kurland, a member of the Westminster-based Save-A-Patriot Fellowship — a group claiming it is intent on ensuring that law is accurately interpreted and appropriately enforced — questioned the court’s refusal to release the woman, who became known as Jane Doe, sooner because of her choice to invoke the Constitution.

“Do you believe she is John Dillinger, public enemy No. 1?” said Kurland, who along with other members of the group refused to identify Doe. “How can you be held for exercising your Fifth Amendment rights?”

However, police, prosecutors and a law professor considered to be an expert on the Fifth Amendment contend that refusing to identify yourself to law enforcement isn’t protected by the Constitution.

“If that were the case, no one would ever have to provide information, and we would have burglars and robbers and people running all over the place not knowing who they were,” Carroll County State’s Attorney Brian DeLeonardo said Tuesday.

Essentially, the Fifth Amendment “protects criminal defendants from having to testify if they might incriminate themselves through the testimony,” according to the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University.

Doe, who continues to refuse to identify herself even after being released from jail, was arrested June 27 after she failed to stop for a Carroll County Sheriff’s Office deputy for a tail light that was out.

Doe, who spoke with the Times on Tuesday afternoon after her release but continued to refuse identifying herself, said she saw lights close behind her but “didn’t know what it was,” so she proceeded at a steady pace. When the trooper made contact with her at a traffic light, she refused to identify herself and had to be forceably removed from her vehicle, according to court documents. She was charged with failure to obey a lawful command, resisting arrest and obstructing an investigation, according to electronic court documents.

Because of her continued refusal to identify herself, neither the Sheriff’s Office nor the State’s Attorney’s Office believed it was prudent to immediately release her, according to Sheriff Jim DeWees.

Arrest and booking photos are provided by law enforcement officials. Arrest does not imply guilt, and criminal charges are merely accusations. A defendant is presumed innocent unless proven guilty and convicted.

The Sheriff’s Office was eventually able to obtain her fingerprints and, after submitting them to the FBI, felt it was no longer necessary to detain her, DeWees said. Her fingerprints were not flagged for any warrants, and they had no connection to any criminal investigations, he said.

“At the end of the day, we felt comfortable through the other outlets she was not a wanted person and felt fairly comfortable she served the appropriate amount of time,” DeWees said.

She was released Tuesday after 67 days at the detention center.

The State’s Attorney’s Office chose not to pursue the charges against Doe, officially dropping the case Aug. 28.

“When we are preparing a case, our overriding concern is always what is just in that situation,” DeLeonardo said. “Ultimately, we knew she wasn’t dangerous, so she served far in excess what she would have if she had cooperated. So essentially, it is an abatement by time served.”

Doe’s stay at the detention center cost the county about $4,500, DeWees said.

“If she had cooperated and displayed a driver’s license, she would’ve gotten a simple repair order and been on her way,” he said. “The lesson is, when the police stop you, you are required to submit a driver’s license. She wanted to play hardball and, in the process, she wasted an awful lot of taxpayer money by doing it her way.”

Doe said the Fifth Amendment is reiterated in the Maryland Constitution’s Declaration of Rights, “That no man ought to be compelled to give evidence against himself in a criminal case.”

“The constitution is the law, and no man ought to be compelled,” Doe said in a phone interview from a number associated with the Save-A-Patriot Fellowship. “Evidence is everything and anything, starting with my name, where I live, my mug shot, and my fingerprints.”

James Duane, a graduate of Harvard Law School and a professor at Regent Law School in Virginia who is considered a Fifth Amendment expert, said the Fifth Amendment does not give someone the right to refuse providing identifying information.

“The Constitutional right to remain silent is vast, and it gives you a right to refuse to answer any request for information that carries a reasonable probability that it could be used to convict you, but the right is limited,” Duane wrote in an email.

“[Eleven] years ago, the Supreme Court of the United States specifically ruled that a request from the police for a suspect to identify himself, assuming that the request was otherwise proper under state law, would not be a violation of the Fifth Amendment, because there is so little chance that such information, by itself, would pose any reasonable probability that it could lead to a conviction of that person.”

Doe said she is aware of the court’s opinion on the matter.

“Courts have ruled on this, and I’m not interested in what the courts say,” she said. “Even a name can be a link in the chain of evidence used to convict you. The last thing [government] wants people to know is that you can refuse to give a name or take a mug shot.”

Another member of the Save-A-Patriot Fellowship, George Otto, said Doe’s actions will help people understand what the country’s Founding Fathers meant when they wrote the U.S. Constitution.

“That’s what Jane Doe does; she helps people understand the law,” Otto said. “One thing we learned, if a law is not written clearly, it should be void.”

Doe also took issue with her length of detainment. The only reason the Sheriff’s Office and State’s Attorney’s Office gave to keep her in jail was the possibility of her being a criminal, she said.

“That’s not enough,” Doe said. “They have to have probable cause — a reason. That’s important to understand. I was told I could literally be a sex offender. ‘Might be’ is not probable cause. It’s their job to be proving things, and it is no man’s job to give evidence against themselves.”

DeLeonardo said there is no issue of this being an inappropriate detention as she was initially detained because of the crime she committed.

“The court refused to release her until she provided the information because they need that information to process her through the system,” DeLeonardo said. “Otherwise you’d have thousands of Jane Does.”

By refusing to identify herself, he said, all Doe was successful at doing was causing additional burden on herself, the county and its taxpayers.

“Essentially, if people think it’s a good route to go and want to spend an enormous amount of time in jail more than they would, they can do that.”

No thanks. I’ll take the ticket, and either pay it or fight it (and win!). Here’s the source.

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beach sand

There are a lot of silly laws on the books. Take this one, for example from the Municipal Code of the City of Manhattan Beach, California:

12.08.300 – Throwing missiles.

No person shall throw, or otherwise propel, any missile, or mud or sand anywhere on the beach.

First of all, what kind of missiles are contemplated here? Second, mud is a missile? Third, sand is a missile? And finally, you’re seriously criminalizing throwing sand on the beach? Bet lots of citations have been written for that one. Here’s the source.  (You’ll have to scroll down to 12.08.300.)


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submarine sandwich

In the wake of all the negative publicity Subway has garnered thanks to Jared, perhaps this could be seen as good publicity? I mean, these kids must really like Subway sandwiches, or they wouldn’t have done this. After all, they could have gone after a lot of other food. Here’s the story, as posted by (Richmond, Virginia):

Police are looking for a trio of teens seen in surveillance video, who robbed a VCU student of his sandwich at gun point.

Surveillance video shows the three teens, in a Subway sandwich shop, not ordering anything, until one asked for a cup of water.

Police said they then followed a man outside the shop on Semmes Avenue just after he got his sandwich, and stole his meal.

The boldness lay in the timing of the crime and how the suspects seemed not to care that they were caught on camera.  “It’s pretty shocking because it was over a sandwich, and we live here,” said Moore. “I’m not going to come out alone at night.”

People living in the neighborhood said apartment managers have warned them of petty crimes like loose change being swiped from cars, but nothing as serious as an armed robbery.

“I saw three kids walking down the block,” said one resident, who believes the three young people he saw, are the same ones seen in surveillance photos as they walked down 12th Street before heading into the sub shop.

Detectives ask anyone with any information about the suspects to call First Precinct Detective Brian Taylor at (804) 646-0689 or call Crime Stoppers at 780-1000.

Here’s the source.

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Yes, you’re right. It wasn’t just any old salt. It was Epsom salt! As reported by The Fraser Coast Chronicle:

A Maryborough man charged with “ice” possession spent four months in prison waiting for forensic analysis of the substance – but was later released when testing determined it was not methylamphetamine.

Four months while the guy languished in prison?

The revelation comes after Maryborough Magistrate John Smith recently criticised the state’s Forensic and Scientific Services, after a matter had to be adjourned to wait for scientific analysis of the suspected drug material.

But Queensland Health, which runs the service also known as the John Tonge Centre, claims there are no delays in forensic testing.

Really? Tell that to the guy with the salt.

Suthers Lawyers solicitor Travis George said he recently had a client who was charged after police found a substance they believed to be methylamphetamine in his car during a routine check.

Mr George said due to his client’s previous criminal history, he spent about four months in prison while waiting for the forensic results which determined the substance was not ice but Epsom Salts.

“The charges were then withdrawn by police,” Mr George said.

Mr George said delays in waiting for forensic analysis were not a new issue.

“It has always been a concern for our clients about delay due to awaiting analysis where it is forensic,” he said.

Mr George’s comments come after Maryborough Magistrate John Smith spoke about the John Tonge Centre when he was forced to adjourn a case for a further two months in order for forensic analysis to be completed.

“For the last 14 years nothing has been done (about the delays),” Mr Smith said.

“Once again the government needs to have a look at what they are doing in relation to this.”

Mr Smith said both the LNP and Labor state governments had “made a song and dance” about improving Forensic and Scientific Services.

But despite this, a Queensland Health spokeswoman denied there was a backlog for Forensic and Scientific Services.

“Urgent cases are completed within the timeframe required by the police and the courts,” she said.

The spokeswoman said the centre was continually assessing evidence testing processes to improve turnaround times.

“All forensic testing performed at FSS is prioritised daily with police and the courts,” she said.

“The time taken to bring a drug case to court is dependent on many factors.”

The centre deals with about 5000 samples in relation to criminal cases each month, with workloads increasing during the past five years. The Queensland Police Service declined to comment saying it was a matter for Queensland Health.

No backlog? No backlog? Here’s the source!

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911 emergency call phone telephone

One would think that, somewhere along the way, this kid learned that 911 is for emergencies only. If not, he should definitely know now. Per The Wisconsin Rapids Tribune police log:

• At 10:49 a.m. Monday, an 11-year-old boy called 911 because his friend used the “F” word at the caller.

Guess what happened next? Nothing, of course!

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trail breadcrumbs bread crumbs candy

Okay so it is vandalism, but it barely register’s on the Vandalometer.  How was he caught? The way many “criminals” are caught, of course – by following the trail of penises! As reported by

A 31-year old man from Aalborg was convicted for a fairly bizarre act of vandalism on Tuesday.

On a visit to the local IKEA in Aalborg, the man had taken one of the store’s wooden pencils and proceeded to casually stroll through the warehouse drawing small penises on the walls and pieces of furniture on display.

“He drew up to 30 penises on walls and shelves around the warehouse,” Rikke Poulsen from the North Jutland police told Berlingske News Bureau.

IKEA staff eventually caught up with the vandal who had left a trail of crudely drawn genitalia in his wake and reported him to the police.

Once caught, the man denied that he was responsible for all the drawings, and that his curious crime was inspired by having seen someone else do it first.

“The man has admitted to being behind these drawings, but not as many as 30. He has no prior convictions and he has explained that he did it because he had seen similar drawings in IKEA. He has regretted his actions, but that doesn’t change the fact that he has still committed vandalism,” Poulsen said.

The man received a suspended sentence of 20 days – and presumably a lifetime ban from IKEA.

Here’s the source.

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purse handbag

Please, tell me you did not just shoplift while carrying coke in your purse.  As reported by Northwest Florida Daily News:

A Walmart Asset Protection Associate became suspicious of the woman, identified as Tammy Sarah King, around 2:30 p.m. on July 31 because she was “constantly twitching and looking over her shoulder,” according to the arrest report. The associate watched her place several grocery items in her cart.

She then tried to hide the items, worth $313.60, under an air filter before walking out of the store, the report said. She was stopped and Crestview Police officers were called.

King told officers that there was cocaine in her purse, according to the report. Officers found two grams of cocaine and $459 in her purse.  She is charged with retail theft over $300 and possession of cocaine, both felonies.

I told you not to tell me that! You’ll find the source, with Ms. King’s mugshot, here.

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phone smartphone cell

If this is the way he treats his own cousin, strangers beware.  As reported in The Brooklyn Paper’s Police Blotter:

84th Precinct – Brooklyn Heights–DUMBO–Boerum Hill–Downtown

Two louts robbed a man outside a Smith Street convenience store on Aug. 15, and fled in a getaway car driven by the victim’s cousin, cops say.

The victim told police that as he was exiting the store near Warren Street around 10 pm, two men approached him, one with something that looked like a gun under his clothes.

The victim surrendered his phone to the miscreants, only to see the pair flee in a blue Jeep driven by his own cousin, according to a report.

Um, sorry cuz? On a positive note, the police have a line on at least one of the suspects!

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Arguments can start over the most absurd things.  Somewhere out there, beyond the absurd things, there’s this, as reported in the Police Blotter of The Moultrie News:

Police were called to a couple’s hotel room due to a verbal argument. The female told police the argument started because her boyfriend “farted on her” and she became angry. She said her boyfriend started to argue with her and yell loudly, according to the report. The boyfriend was questioned and he told police his girlfriend farted on him once and so he farted twice back on her, the report said.

The boyfriend then left the room because he didn’t want any additional problems.

The couple calmed down and decided to drive home rather than stay at the hotel any longer.

Hopefully the car windows were open!